Memoir '44 D-Day Landings Memoir '44 D-Day Landings

Forums

Search
Forums » Memoir '44 - English » When the Tigers Broke Free
Show: Today's Posts 
  
AuthorTopic
PlanBee
Senior Member
Second Lieutenant

User Pages
Posts: 118
Registered:
May 2007
When the Tigers Broke Free Mon, 08 February 2010 20:59
I am not a Pink Floyd fan at all, but I heard this song the other day and I dont think I have heard a song that better evokes the feeling of being in the front line. I mean there are plenty of anti war songs, but not many that puts you in the front line

It was just before dawn
One miserable morning in black 'forty four.
When the forward commander
Was told to sit tight
When he asked that his men be withdrawn.
And the Generals gave thanks
As the other ranks held back
The enemy tanks for a while.
And the Anzio bridgehead
Was held for the price
Of a few hundred ordinary lives.

And kind old King George
Sent Mother a note
When he heard that father was gone.
It was, I recall,
In the form of a scroll,
With gold leaf and all.
And I found it one day
In a drawer of old photographs, hidden away.
And my eyes still grow damp to remember
His Majesty signed
With his own rubber stamp.

It was dark all around.
There was frost in the ground
When the tigers broke free.
And no one survived
From the Royal Fusiliers Company C.
They were all left behind,
Most of them dead,
The rest of them dying.
And that's how the High Command
Took my daddy from me.

Remeber this when you next send your last remaining Sherman in.

Anyother similar songs?
      
Achtung Panzer
Senior Member
Leutnant

User Pages
Posts: 1024
Registered:
December 2007
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Mon, 08 February 2010 21:08
Bob Dylan's John Brown?

John Brown went off to war to fight on a foreign shore.
His mama sure was proud of him!
He stood straight and tall in his uniform and all.
His mama's face broke out all in a grin.

"Oh son, you look so fine, I'm glad you're a son of mine,
You make me proud to know you hold a gun.
Do what the captain says, lots of medals you will get,
And we'll put them on the wall when you come home."

As that old train pulled out, John's ma began to shout,
Tellin' ev'ryone in the neighborhood:
"That's my son that's about to go, he's a soldier now, you know."
She made well sure her neighbors understood.

She got a letter once in a while and her face broke into a smile
As she showed them to the people from next door.
And she bragged about her son with his uniform and gun,
And these things you called a good old-fashioned war.

Then the letters ceased to come, for a long time they did not come.
They ceased to come for about ten months or more.
Then a letter finally came saying, "Go down and meet the train.
Your son's a-coming home from the war."

She smiled and went right down, she looked everywhere and all around
But she could not see her soldier son in sight.
But as all the people passed, she saw her son at last,
When she did she could hardly believe her eyes.

His face was all shot up and his hand were all blown off
And he wore a metal brace around his waist.
He whispered kind of slow, in a voice she did not know,
While she couldn't even recognize his face!

"Oh tell me, my darling son, pray tell me what they've gone and done.
How is it you come to be this way?"
He tried his best to talk but his mouth could hardly move
And the mother had to turn her face away.

"Don't you remember, Ma, when I went off to war
You thought it was the best thing I could do?
I was on the battleground, you were home . . . acting proud.
You wasn't there standing in my shoes."

"Oh, and I thought when I was there, God, what am I doing here?
I'm a-tryin' to kill somebody or die tryin'.
But the thing that scared me most was when my enemy came close
And I saw that his face looked just like mine."

"And I couldn't help but think, through the thunder rolling stink,
That I was just a puppet in a play.
And through the roar and smoke, this string it finally broke,
And a cannon ball blew my eyes away."

As he turned away to walk, his Ma was still in shock
At seein' the metal brace that helped him stand.
But as he turned to go, he called his mother close
And he dropped his medals down into her hand.

Copyright ©1963; renewed 1991 Special Rider Music
      
tank commander
Senior Member
I Love Pineapples

User Pages
Posts: 2005
Registered:
October 2004
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Mon, 08 February 2010 23:32
Al Stewart's Roads to Moscow from his Past,Present and Future album. A great song and there are many other worthwhile tracks on that one.
      
OldBloodandGuts
Senior Member

User Pages
Posts: 306
Registered:
May 2007
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Tue, 09 February 2010 20:04
Not a pop song, but one of the best war poems ever written. Owen was killed in action in November of 1918; his mother received the notice of his death on Armistice Day.

Dulce et Decorum Est
by Wilfred Owen (1917)

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of disappointed shells that dropped behind.

GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And floundering like a man in fire or lime.--
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.

---

DULCE ET DECORUM EST - the first words of a Latin saying (taken from an ode by Horace). The words were widely understood and often quoted at the start of the First World War. They mean "It is sweet and right." The full saying ends the poem: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori - it is sweet and right to die for your country. In other words, it is a wonderful and great honour to fight and die for your country
      
ad79
Senior Member
Major Howard

User Pages
Posts: 785
Registered:
September 2007
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Tue, 09 February 2010 20:04
guybee wrote on Mon, 08 February 2010 20:59

I am not a Pink Floyd fan at all, but I heard this song the other day and I dont think I have heard a song that better evokes the feeling of being in the front line. I mean there are plenty of anti war songs, but not many that puts you in the front line

It was just before dawn
One miserable morning in black 'forty four.
When the forward commander
Was told to sit tight
When he asked that his men be withdrawn.
And the Generals gave thanks
As the other ranks held back
The enemy tanks for a while.
And the Anzio bridgehead
Was held for the price
Of a few hundred ordinary lives.



I don't know about any other songs, but this song actually led me to read about the Anzio bridgehead and make a scenario about it.
And it is a great song.

Stig Morten
      
Boddekker
Member
Major

User Pages
Posts: 82
Registered:
December 2005
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Thu, 11 February 2010 21:29
Roger Waters wrote that song for Pink Floyd. His father was one of those few hundred ordinary lives.

And I agree: "Roads to Moscow" by Al Stewart is brilliant - a tragic song about one Russian soldier's life, with an ending that was repeated all too often.
      
Achtung Panzer
Senior Member
Leutnant

User Pages
Posts: 1024
Registered:
December 2007
Re:When the Tigers Broke Free Fri, 12 February 2010 10:03
The Waterboys Red Army Blues

When I left my home and my family
my mother said to me
"Son, it's not how many Germans you kill that counts
It's how many people you set free!"

So I packed my bags
brushed my cap
Walked out into the world
seventeen years old
Never kissed a girl

Took the train to Voronezh
that was as far as it would go
Changed my sacks for a uniform
bit my lip against the snow
I prayed for mother Russia
in the summer of '43
And as we drove the Germans back
I really believed
That God was listening to me

We howled into Berlin
tore the smoking buildings down
Raised the red flag high
burnt the Reichstag brown
I saw my first American
and he looked a lot like me
He had the same kinda farmer's face
said he'd come from some place called Hazzard, Tennessee

Then the war was over
my discharge papers came
Me and twenty hundred others
went to Stettiner for the train
Kiev! said the commissar
from there your own way home
But I never got to Kiev
we never came by home
Train went north to the Taiga
we were stripped and marched in file
Up the great siberian road
for miles and miles and miles and miles
Dressed in stripes and tatters
in a gulag left to die
All because Comrade Stalin was scared that
we'd become too westernized!

Used to love my country
used to be so young
Used to believe that life was
the best song ever sung
I would have died for my country
in 1945
But now only one thing remains
but now only one thing remains
But now only one thing remains
but now only one thing remains
The brute will to survive!
      
    
Previous Topic:Bunkers and Sandbags-Terrain?
Next Topic:Pavlov, Hero of the Soviet Union
Goto Forum: