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rasmussen81
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World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 08:04
As many of you know, I'm a 5th grade teacher and our school year is starting to wind down. I believe my principal sent out an e-mail saying that we have 38 days left of teaching!! Very Happy I have been teaching World War II by using Memoir '44 for the past three years (counting this year) and next week I'll be starting my final after-school History Club session of the year.

I've been wondering lately, when countries teach World War II in the schools. I definitely didn't learn anything about this war in elementary school (grade 1-5) and I don't believe I heard anything about it during middle school either (grade 6-8). I might have learned about it a little bit in high school (maybe in grade 10 or 11) but I don't remember it very clearly because we didn't spend much time on it. In college I took a history course that touched briefly on World War II, but it wasn't until I started playing Memoir '44 that I actually started to remember anything about the war!! Razz How crazy is that?!

I'm curious, if people are willing to weigh in from around the world: At what age is World War II history taught in your education systems? Is very much time spent on this topic and what material do your schools teach? Rolling Eyes
      
Mighty Jim 83
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 09:35
The topics taught in history tend to vary a lot between schools here in the UK, so I can't say how widely applicable this information is, but I can give a few examples.

Last year, I spent a week working in a local primary school, and they were just starting a topic on WWII. That was a mixed year 3 & 4 class (so 7-9 year-olds) As I was only there for the introductory lesson, I'm not really sure how much they actually studied, or what aspects they focused on. I vaguely remember that we studied "20th century Britain" when I was in year 6 (10 or 11 years old) but we basically just looked at how to build an anderson shelter and imagined life during an air-raid without really thinking about the battle side.

When I was in 6th form (16-18 years old) about 1/2 of history students seemed to do "The European Dictatorships" - i.e. two years on Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini. Again mostly concerned with domestic events and politics, but necessarily touching on the war. Obviously, the whole education system has been completely revamped since then (No A-levels any more, just these funny AS & A2 things), so no idea what they study now.

Hope that helps a bit?
      
tank commander
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 11:35
Grade school history and WW II,hmmmm. You know is has been so long I cannot recall if this was covered at all then. I did order a paperback book on the Battle of Britain in 6th grade. So I guess, at the very least I covered it myself a bit.

We did cover it in Junior High (now called Middle School Rolling Eyes -- I liked Junior High more as that name has more class Laughing).

By the way, my "discovery" of the JH library was an eye opener -- a 20 vol set on WW II along with many other books on this conflict. I did not recall the grade school library having any of this material. I ould check out as many books of that set as possible at one time and dove into those pages. Great stuff.

As to High School which I guess should be called top school, I am sure we touched on that subject.
      
ad79
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 13:54
In Norway pupils should learn about "recent" events that shaped Norway and major conflicts of the 20th centruy during years 8-10.
There is also about Jews in Religion and 8-10 tells about major events in the history of Jews.
And philosophy and ethics (part of the same subject that covers religion) touches moral and ethical questions and racism during year 5-7. WWII and espacially Holocaust can be used during these lessons.

Stig Morten
      
nemesszili
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 14:37
See this post (I wrote this when I was a 7th grader):

http://www.daysofwonder.com/en/msg/?goto=166793#msg_166793
      
stevens
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 15:19
Hey Jesse,
In Virginia, students in 7th grade are required as part of their Standards of Learning (SOL's) to study several elements of World War II history. Our emphasis at the National D-Day Memorial is to assist in this education by providing a 50 minute hands-on tent program accompanied by a 45 minute tour of the National memorial. Schools pay a nominal fee per student for this service and it incorporates some of the instructional time for SOL's so that it is a time of instruction and not just a field day.

The tent program covers some of the elements of the home front, like rationing and victory gardens as well as displays of military equipment used by the frontline troops on D-Day. Since soldiers from our community were involved in the initial assault at the Dog Green sector of Omaha beach, there is some instruction related to what there training was like as well as how the impact of their loss (19 out of 35 boys from this community killed just on D-Day) impacted the town of Bedford.

As the students walk through the memorial the tour guide relates the process of the invasion from planning and preparation in England, the battle along the coast of Normandy followed by consolidation and victory in the upper part of the Memorial.

see website and photos below:
http://www.dday.org/index.php?page=education

http://www.dday.org/index.php?page=showGallery&module=ga llery&id=1000060&action=F

Pardon the shameless self promotion...
Cool
      
Achtung Panzer
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 15:27
I agree with Mighty Jim 83. My children began learning about WW2 at school around age 9 (earlier at home!) but mostly from a UK perspective with little, if anything on the Pacific.

[Updated on: Fri, 23 April 2010 15:28]

      
rasmussen81
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 15:55
Mighty Jim 83 wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 00:35

The topics taught in history tend to vary a lot between schools here in the UK, so I can't say how widely applicable this information is, but I can give a few examples.

Hope that helps a bit?


I think that teaching material changes quite a bit from State to State here in the United States as well (and teacher by teacher), so it's not surprising that it varies in the UK. Thanks for your examples and yes, it does help give me a clearer picture of how World War II history is covered. I'm just curious and thought this would be a good community to learn from since we're from all over the world.

One of the things I notice about all of the responses is that each of our education systems focus on the local effects and contributions to this global conflict. Interesting!

Thanks for sharing, everyone. Cool

I wonder why I don't remember learning much about World War II before high school. My guess would be that it wasn't presented much (in Oregon, our teaching standards don't require us to teach specifically about World War II until high school, age 15+). The other problem is that trying to teach about World War II can dissolve into meaningless facts and dates instead of the epic struggle of nations over the surface of most of the world!! There are so many intense stories there to tell! Very Happy

[Updated on: Fri, 23 April 2010 16:06]

      
rasmussen81
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 15:57
stevens wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 06:19


see website and photos below:
http://www.dday.org/index.php?page=education

http://www.dday.org/index.php?page=showGallery&module=ga llery&id=1000060&action=F

Pardon the shameless self promotion...
Cool


No need to apologize! Get the name of the memorial out there and share as many pictures as you want!!! If I lived closer I would love to visit and have someone show me around the place. Cool
      
rasmussen81
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 16:09
Do we have any other teachers out there who try to teach about World War II? I've been teaching my elementary students and they love learning about this war, but I know they won't get much more about it until 9th or 10th grade (in 3 or 4 years!) so hopefully they won't have forgotten everything! Confused
      
Mighty Jim 83
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 17:58
Having spoken to some Primary Teaching friends, it seems confirmed that the topics for Primary history are largely left to the teachers' or at least the schools discretion.

However, they do have government websites which provide suggested schemes of work.

this link -
http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/schemes2/history/
is one website listing about 20 possible topics for schools, as you can see, only "what was life like for children in the second world war" and "what are we remembering on remembrance day" have any real link.
      
JJAZ
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 18:08
In Belgium we have i think the most battlefields of the world Embarassed
We had Napoleon and his battle over in Waterloo.
We had also WW1 (ypres) and WW2 (Bastogne),
What surprises me most is that my children hardly learn about the war in school.
On the other hand if i visit the many war cemetary's in my nighberhood i always see loads of coaches from England , Schotland etc... i even spoke some canadian tourists last weekend from toronto at tiny cott cemetry near ypres.
I hear in the UK its a tradition for schools to learn and visit the WW1 and WW2 war memorials over here.
So yes it seems there are countries that remember our heroes.
Sinceraly
J.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 18:49
Mighty Jim 83 wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 08:58


However, they do have government websites which provide suggested schemes of work.

this link -
http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/schemes2/history/
is one website listing about 20 possible topics for schools, as you can see, only "what was life like for children in the second world war" and "what are we remembering on remembrance day" have any real link.


So at what age do they actually teach about World War II? I can see how there are some concepts and topics that wouldn't be appropriate for younger students, but the topic in general is very relevant for every age. The sacrifice that people made all around the world is amazing and we owe it to them to remember them by teaching every generation about World War II! Smile

I know, I'm preaching to the choir here, because you all agree that this time in history is important. Very Happy

I really enjoy learning about how other countries handle this history, so thanks for sharing! JJAZ, I'm sorry to hear that kids don't learn much about the conflict that took place in your country. Sounds like you need to get Memoir '44 for everyone!! Laughing
      
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 22:18
Ras

I am English and my son has been learning about WW2 for most of his school life.

He is now 11 and really well informed about WW2.

As far as I can remember, this year he did about children evacuees, last year something about everyone carrying gas masks, the year before about Normandy.

Last year he also went on a school trip to France where they visited the WW1 battlefields and the Menin GATE. This year they went to the Imperial War Museum.

When I was at school (70's) we did all about WW2 as it was the last war Britain had been in. These days it's sadly not the same, Falklands, Bosnia, Gulf, Sierra Leone, 2nd Gulf, Afghanistan.

On Wednesday our town had a homecoming parade for our local regiment (Warwickshire Fusiliers) coming back from Afghanistan. I was very impressed that my sons school marched his class (senior class) up to town to watch the troops marching through the town. I gave him my medals to wear (right breast for family members medals) and he said lots of people asked him about them.

So I guess the answer to your question is that in the UK it is taught a lot, but then it's all right on our doorstep and there are very few families that have not been touched by it.

Phil
      
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 22:26
Thanks for the interesting information, Phil! I'm glad to hear your son has been learning about this, and it does make sense because it was all right there and so many people were affected.

Does your son like playing Memoir '44 with you since he knows so much about World War II?
      
JJAZ
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Re:World War II in Education Fri, 23 April 2010 23:39
Well a dutch version of the game would be helpfull Laughing
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sat, 24 April 2010 00:19
JJAZ wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 14:39

Well a dutch version of the game would be helpfull Laughing


Yea, that might help! So when do you start your translating project?! Laughing
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sat, 24 April 2010 05:50
I am also a teacher, History teacher (11th grade). I teach my students only about 1 week worth of WW2. We are required to go from the Founding of the Nation (USA) to the present in 90 days. Love standardized tests and the "No Child left Behind" Mad But that is a different subject...
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sat, 24 April 2010 17:54
Nordiskanc wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 20:50

I am also a teacher, History teacher (11th grade). I teach my students only about 1 week worth of WW2. We are required to go from the Founding of the Nation (USA) to the present in 90 days. Love standardized tests and the "No Child left Behind" Mad But that is a different subject...


Ah yes, another victim of "No Child Left Behind"! Crying or Very Sad In fifth grade we have to sacrifice every other subject to make sure they're ready for the Math, Reading, and Science test...I guess history, art, writing, and Language Arts just aren't important! Evil or Very Mad

Since I get to teach them all day long, though, I can plug in some good history lessons and writing practice when I want! It must be hard to only have them for your block of time and still fit everything in.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sat, 24 April 2010 18:11
Hi,

In France, children learn the WWII in 3me (collège) and 1re (lycée) or that is old 14 and 16.

Sorry for my very bad english.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sat, 24 April 2010 18:28
Gilgamesh wrote on Sat, 24 April 2010 09:11

Hi,

In France, children learn the WWII in 3me (collège) and 1re (lycée) or that is old 14 and 16.

Sorry for my very bad english.


Don't worry about your English...it's much better than my French!! Very Happy

Thanks for weighing in. Cool
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 00:16
I'm 69 years old. I was in what we called grade school in the late 1940's and early 1950's. In our section of town there we no Jr. high school, we went right into high school, 1956-1960. I don't remember much about grade school, did have U.S. History in high school and do remember some WW II history there.
Most of what I know about WWII came from documentaries, my collection of books on WWII, and watching John Wayne war movies, not very real, but fun.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 11:35
rasmussen81 wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 21:26

Thanks for the interesting information, Phil! I'm glad to hear your son has been learning about this, and it does make sense because it was all right there and so many people were affected.

Does your son like playing Memoir '44 with you since he knows so much about World War II?


Sadly, no. However he is an expert on WW2 weapons from playing "World at War" on his xBox. Last time I took him to the Imperial War Museum he was pointing out and naming all the WW2 weapons and tanks to me.

Quote:

We are required to go from the Founding of the Nation (USA) to the present in 90 days


At least you don't have much to go through then; in the UK we don't even class that as History Very Happy Laughing

[Updated on: Sun, 25 April 2010 11:36]

      
OldBloodandGuts
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 19:02
rasmussen81 wrote on Fri, 23 April 2010 10:09

Do we have any other teachers out there who try to teach about World War II? I've been teaching my elementary students and they love learning about this war, but I know they won't get much more about it until 9th or 10th grade (in 3 or 4 years!) so hopefully they won't have forgotten everything! Confused


I'm an English teacher, currently working at an elite public high school in Illinois, but before that I taught at colleges and a university. One of the courses I've taught was a "Literature of World War Two" course. Although my focus was almost entirely on fiction, one of the things that amazed me on the first day was that over half the class (of 18-25 year olds) didn't know the first thing about WW2. I actually had to change my plan for the first few days and put together a 40-minute PowerPoint on the war, just to teach the basics!

It was a fun course where I balanced a theme from the war -- the Holocaust, nuclear war, Japanese internment camps, etc. -- with readings from Studs Terkel's non-fiction oral history *The Good War* and a novel. So first the students would read first-hand accounts of battles or themes, then they'd read the fiction versions (often written by veterans).

So if anyone is curious, of if you're looking for some good summer reading, I can happily recommend these books from my syllabus:

Fires on the Plain by Shohei Ooka
A Japanese veteran who writes a story of survival set in the Philippines.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
A bizarre satirical novel about American bomber pilots in Italy that emphasizes the absurdity of war (Heller was a bombardier).

Maus by Art Spiegelman
An oddly powerful graphic novel about the holocaust written by the son of a holocaust survivor.

The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
A cross-cultural story about the end of WW2 as seen through the eyes of a Canadian nurse -- and a far better product than the 1996 film adaptation.

Black Rain by Masuji Ibuse
A fascinating novel about the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima from the perspective of Japanese civilians.

Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson
War indirectly shatters the bonds of a small community in the Pacific northwest when the whites go off to fight and the Japanese are put into internment camps. A sad and surprisingly beautiful story.

Slaughterhouse V by Kurt Vonnegut
Post-modernism at its absurd finest as Billy Pilgrim, the time-traveling, alien-abducted protagonist, ventures back first to the Battle of the Bulge and then, as a POW, to the city of Dresden when it is firebombed by the Allies. Vonnegut was also a vet present at both events.

Enjoy!
      
nemesszili
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 19:12
"Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
A bizarre satirical novel about American bomber pilots in Italy that emphasizes the absurdity of war (Heller was a bombardier)."

Just reading it! Very Happy
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 19:14
Wow, thanks for the summer reading list! Very Happy

It's great to see there are so many other teachers (and students) out there playing Memoir '44! Cool
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 21:30
nemesszili wrote on Sun, 25 April 2010 13:12

"Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
A bizarre satirical novel about American bomber pilots in Italy that emphasizes the absurdity of war (Heller was a bombardier)."

Just reading it! Very Happy


My students almost universally hated it, so I'll be eager to hear your thoughts!
      
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Re:World War II in Education Sun, 25 April 2010 22:03
My mother recommended, that I should read this one (next to "For Whom The Bell Tolls" and "A Farewell to Arms" by Hemingway - of course, in Hungarian, I'll have to obtain an advanced level of English knowledge to begin reading in English).
I'll report as soon as I will finish reading it. So far, Yossarian just survived the Bologna raid and went into hospital... and there are so many crazy people around with so crazy names like "Major Major" promoted to Major Laughing.

[Updated on: Sun, 25 April 2010 22:06]

      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 07:13
I grew up in a military family (Navy) so having a father and older brother interested in military history I naturally gravitated toward it.

In high school we only did quick timeline studies for the US and World history classes I took. It seemed we only hit the main points for the Revolutionary War, Almost nothing of the Civil War, WWI, WWII and Vietnam. We did do a great simulation on the starting of WWI where the class was divided into major power nations and puppet governments. I saw the futility in negotiating with my classmates as they were all unwilling to make concessions to avert the war... So I started it for my team (Austria) by invading Serbia.

I can't remember much of my early education as I think most of those brain cells were killed off during my time in the military and college... I do remember studing all the major time periods and not learning (remembering) much...

I have to give thanks to Richard Borg for creating three great games C&C:Ancients, Battle Cry and Memoir '44... because of these my love for learning history and warfare studies has been resurected.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 09:45
nemesszili wrote on Sun, 25 April 2010 21:03

My mother recommended, that I should read this one (next to "For Whom The Bell Tolls" and "A Farewell to Arms" by Hemingway - of course, in Hungarian, I'll have to obtain an advanced level of English knowledge to begin reading in English).



I don't think you'd need a particularly advanced level of English to read Hemingway - not sure he ever really mastered the subordinate clause!
In fact, if you're looking for an easy introduction to English-language novels, Hemingway is probably a good place to start.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 21:08
Mighty Jim 83 wrote on Mon, 26 April 2010 03:45

nemesszili wrote on Sun, 25 April 2010 21:03

My mother recommended, that I should read this one (next to "For Whom The Bell Tolls" and "A Farewell to Arms" by Hemingway - of course, in Hungarian, I'll have to obtain an advanced level of English knowledge to begin reading in English).



I don't think you'd need a particularly advanced level of English to read Hemingway - not sure he ever really mastered the subordinate clause!
In fact, if you're looking for an easy introduction to English-language novels, Hemingway is probably a good place to start.


Faulkner once said, derisively, of Hemingway that he "has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary."

To which Hemingway responded, fittingly, "Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words."

Gotta love it when two Nobel Prize winners in literature trade insults.
Smile
      
OldBloodandGuts
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 21:11
nemesszili wrote on Sun, 25 April 2010 16:03

My mother recommended, that I should read this one (next to "For Whom The Bell Tolls" and "A Farewell to Arms" by Hemingway - of course, in Hungarian, I'll have to obtain an advanced level of English knowledge to begin reading in English).
I'll report as soon as I will finish reading it. So far, Yossarian just survived the Bologna raid and went into hospital... and there are so many crazy people around with so crazy names like "Major Major" promoted to Major Laughing.


Yep, Major Major Major was a favorite of my students (not really).

The Hemingway novels are good, too -- For Whom the Bell Tolls is kind of long, not his greatest work, about the Spanish Civil War. Farewell to Arms is a great piece set during the Great War.
      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 21:42
"For Whom the Bell Tolls" - I already read it last year, and I found it pretty enjoyable! Smile

[Updated on: Mon, 26 April 2010 22:06]

      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 21:48
nemesszili wrote on Mon, 26 April 2010 12:42

"For Whom the Bell Tolls" - I already read it last year, and I found it pretty enjoyable.


Well, I guess I don't need to read that one! Confused Thanks for telling the ending!! Rolling Eyes

[Updated on: Mon, 26 April 2010 22:26]

      
nemesszili
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 22:06
Sorry for telling the ending. Perhaps I should edit my previous post...
      
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Re:World War II in Education Mon, 26 April 2010 22:28
nemesszili wrote on Mon, 26 April 2010 13:06

Sorry for telling the ending. Perhaps I should edit my previous post...


I don't know that I would have read it...my free time is taken up reading other books right now...but it's always nice to have the ending of a book be a surprise! Very Happy

I commend you for reading such 'classics' during your education! Cool
      
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Re:World War II in Education Tue, 27 April 2010 04:53
I don't read much fiction (unless it's Science Fiction). I don't know the name of the short story, but I remember reading a short story in school about an American fighter pilot shot down in WWII. He wakes up in an English hospital, shown by the English speaking doctors and nurses. But then, while alone, he hears a distinctly sounding German airplane fly over. He gets out of bed, fighting pain and disconnecting his IV, and stumbles over to the window. He looks out at the only thing he can see is a sign written in French that says "Beware of Dog". I thing that is the name of the story, "Beware of Dog" in French. That story really piqued my interest in world war two history.

      
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Re:World War II in Education Tue, 27 April 2010 10:36
I dont know guys, but history is very hmmm how shall I say it.. well it seems to be in the Eve of the beholder.

Example, while a child in the USA , I had the honor to learn USA History while in the South and we moved and then in the North. in the North the said to "free the slaves" in the South they taught, the states freely joined the Union and had the right to freely leave the Union. Their complaint was being economic exploition by the North. Even Mr. Linclon said he cared not if all men stay slaves, or if some are free while ohters are slaves. Important for Lincln was to keep the nation together...

The D Day invasion is celebrated in the USA "freeing Europe" and about all the US lives lost in the landings, but...... many more Frence civilains died in the bombings than US soldiers and the Soviets were already in Poland......... if the west allies did not land at D Day, the Soviets would have gotten all of europe,, so the landings in D Day were so that the USA and UK could get a piece of Europe. thats not so noble now is it? So " D day liberates Europe" is much like the "free the slaves" etc... we are I feel always looking at history thru "the eye of the beholder"...

Again US History. As a child we had "thanksgiving" with the Indians etc.. then we went on to founding the nation on the "virgin continent".. I asked where are the Indians... was NOT good.. so the "nation born in freedon" is perhaps the "nation born in genocide" but that is not what the beholder wants to see. right?

I still feel that what we learn and teach about history is more than supect..

Cheers
Mike

      
OldBloodandGuts
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Re:World War II in Education Tue, 27 April 2010 16:48
Maimed wrote on Tue, 27 April 2010 04:36

I dont know guys, but history is very hmmm how shall I say it.. well it seems to be in the Eve of the beholder.

Example, while a child in the USA , I had the honor to learn USA History while in the South and we moved and then in the North. in the North the said to "free the slaves" in the South they taught, the states freely joined the Union and had the right to freely leave the Union. Their complaint was being economic exploition by the North. Even Mr. Linclon said he cared not if all men stay slaves, or if some are free while ohters are slaves. Important for Lincln was to keep the nation together...

The D Day invasion is celebrated in the USA "freeing Europe" and about all the US lives lost in the landings, but...... many more Frence civilains died in the bombings than US soldiers and the Soviets were already in Poland......... if the west allies did not land at D Day, the Soviets would have gotten all of europe,, so the landings in D Day were so that the USA and UK could get a piece of Europe. thats not so noble now is it? So " D day liberates Europe" is much like the "free the slaves" etc... we are I feel always looking at history thru "the eye of the beholder"...

Again US History. As a child we had "thanksgiving" with the Indians etc.. then we went on to founding the nation on the "virgin continent".. I asked where are the Indians... was NOT good.. so the "nation born in freedon" is perhaps the "nation born in genocide" but that is not what the beholder wants to see. right?

I still feel that what we learn and teach about history is more than supect..

Cheers
Mike




In many ways, history is absolutely in the eye of the beholder, as you say.

Funny you should bring up the Civil War -- even almost 150 years later, Americans are still debating its history. For proof of the debate, you need only look to the recent declaration by Virginia's governor of "Confederate History Month." He was lambasted (and rightfully so, IMHO) for making no mention of slavery in his initial proclamation (he latter added something about it). I this was an error of omission, not vindictiveness, yet the uproar it caused shows how tender a subject that war still is, over a century later.

To me, the claims that the Civil War were about "states rights" or the "right to leave the union" ring pretty hollow. After all, the only right Southerners were inflexible on, trying to preserve, and willing to leave the Union for was the right to own slaves.

Your WWII points are interesting, too. Certainly the "race to Berlin" at the war's end was as much about defeating Naziism as it was about containing Communism.

Perhaps the best we can do teach history is to try to learn as many sides of the story we can. I know it's a cliche, but a good friend of mine used to say there's always three sides to every story: my side, your side, and what really happened.
      
rasmussen81
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Re:World War II in Education Tue, 27 April 2010 16:51
Maimed, here's a book you might like:

Lies My Teacher Told Me.

It talks specifically about United States history, but it outlines how history is 'rewritten' to make certain things look worse and other things look completely innocent. Like the saying goes, "The winners get to write the history." Confused
      
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