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unihead
Senior Member
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Posts: 106
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September 2004
As much strategy as there seems to be? Mon, 24 January 2005 03:19
Don't get me wrong, I love this game. We've played three times and it's always been a hoot. But I always have the sneaking suspicion that the game *pretends* to be about deduction and strategy, but in fact has little of either.

In all three occasions all of the four players came to the same conclusion about the murderer on the same turn, and the winner was just the person who made it to the Capitulum first that turn.

We've been wracking our brains to come up with cleverer questions and better strategies, but the game seems to come down to the fact that everyone discovers the murderer at about the same time by the process of elimination, not by clever deduction.

I'd be quite happy to be proved wrong in this assertion however! Perhaps we need some better clues about deductive reasoning. What do you other players think?
      
Luke the Flaming
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Posts: 270
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July 2003
Re:As much strategy as there seems to be? Mon, 24 January 2005 12:52
More players = more chaos = less strategy

There's some strategy, but MoA isn't what I consider a "strategical boardgame", in any case.

P.S. sometimes it happens that several players discover the truth in the same turn, but it wasn't SO common, in our games.
      
unihead
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September 2004
Re:As much strategy as there seems to be? Mon, 24 January 2005 22:54
Luke the Flaming wrote on Mon, 24 January 2005 06:52

More players = more chaos = less strategy


Don't know if I agree with that. We were only four players, which I thought would have been perfect for the game. And we really got into it, concentrated, tried different things etc.

Quote:

There's some strategy, but MoA isn't what I consider a "strategical boardgame", in any case.


Perhaps I used the wrong word. What I mean is, that despite a game's worth of deductions, it feels like you could pretty much do anything and everyone would still work it out on the same turn. So asking questions started to feel a little pointless. I was hoping that it would make more impact to the outcome if someone made better deductions than someone else. Instead of just a 'race for the finish'.

Quote:

P.S. sometimes it happens that several players discover the truth in the same turn, but it wasn't SO common, in our games.


Ahh well, maybe it's just me!!
      
MarkoPolo
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Posts: 141
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October 2002
Re:As much strategy as there seems to be? Tue, 25 January 2005 03:33
While I definately agree that Mystery is not a pure deduction game, there is certainly some advantage if you have good reasoning and deductive skills.

As an example, at last year's World Board Game Championships in the 4-player Mystery of the Abbey finals the winner figured out the culprit in about 20 minutes - I think it was sometime after the 2nd mass. No one else was even close to getting it when he won.

The winner figured out that all the Brothers (except one) had been accounted for by himself and 2 of the other players. (he had been able to look into the hand of Player A and Player B had stated she had one brother card and later in a second question confirmed the Brother's name).

When Player C stated that he had not seen any Templar Brothers, the player who won, was then certain of the culprit because he had already accounted for all the brothers - except for one.

As for asking better questions, if you haven't seen it, check out the Advanced Play Strategies and Tactics page at:

http://www.mysteryoftheabbey.com/index.php?t=blog&topic= 4&rid=7&S=527a9109857a6dc97e8f61978053eeab

Have fun,
      
    
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