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Hoyts
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December 2005
How to ask questions Mon, 09 October 2006 02:08
Just read the rule book in prep of our first game. My question to you veterns. When you ask another player a question, do they answer in public or private? I am wondering in a 6 player game would the other 4 players be privy to both the question and answer? These seems like a way to get free information by not even being involved in that "play". Please let me know how you handle this.

Thanks.
      
GreatDane
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June 2004
Re:How to ask questions Tue, 10 October 2006 09:57
Everything must be public - unless one of you can play a card that instruct you to whisper or show a card in secret.

So yes, everybody else will be listening in - which is why you need to convolute questions in such a way that it will difficult to extract accurate information about it.

But you would need to do this anyway as there there is no reason to give away information to the person you are talking to either.

This is very tricky, and I'm afraid that I am not very good it myself. And it becomes even more tricky if the people you play aren't 100% sure on the question asked. many games are ruined when someone ask a question so clever that nobody but himself understands it - in which case he will likely be told a false answer.

Let us say that you have just been shown (in privacy) Brother Julian, who is a slim, bearded Benedictine. Instead of asking:
"How many slim Benedictines have you seen?"
could you ask:
"How many monks of the same stature and order as the person you just showed me have you seen?"

That will give you the exact same information (if the person you are asking can remember who he showed you!) without giving any information at all to the other players.

[Updated on: Tue, 10 October 2006 10:00]

      
skerpe
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Posts: 3
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December 2006
Re:How to ask questions Sun, 17 December 2006 13:42
Hi,
I'm pretty new to this game. The first time we played, we were six to play. At first glance, six players isn't an ideal number. Four seems much better.
Anyway, one of the players came up with the following question:

Give me, in order, starting from upper left corner of your suspect sheet, in rows towards the bottom right corner: all characteristics of the monks you have marked as seen.

"What?" That was the groups reaction too. Well, since the question didn't imply naming a suspect, I allowed it.

But still.... Just wondering what others think about this one.

Cheers,
Lion of Flanders.

[Updated on: Sun, 17 December 2006 14:54]

      
guest304721
Junior Member

Posts: 1
Registered:
January 2007
Re:How to ask questions Wed, 03 January 2007 00:23
That "Give me in order" etc. is an order, not a question, and should not have been allowed, in my opinion. . . . but then while I have read the rules, I have never actually played the game yet.
      
Cato_the_Elder
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December 2006
Re:How to ask questions Wed, 03 January 2007 18:04
He could rephrase it as a question to get the same response. Here is an example: "What are, in order, starting from upper left corner of your suspect sheet, in rows towards the bottom right corner, all characteristics of the monks you have marked as seen."

It is probably objectionable because it essentially requires the person being questioned to name each person he has eliminated. Even though the answer would not use a name it would use the functional equivalent of a name.
      
GreatDane
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June 2004
Re:How to ask questions Wed, 10 January 2007 12:01
The question is legal, but will give everybody else the exact same information. So unless the player has a card that will grant him an extra turn will he be the last to actually use the acquired information.

Much better to get information no-one else can use because they don't know the characters involved.
      
Cinnibar
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Posts: 3
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November 2004
Re:How to ask questions Wed, 18 April 2007 09:03
Cato_the_Elder wrote on Wed, 03 January 2007 09:04

He could rephrase it as a question to get the same response. Here is an example: "What are, in order, starting from upper left corner of your suspect sheet, in rows towards the bottom right corner, all characteristics of the monks you have marked as seen."

It is probably objectionable because it essentially requires the person being questioned to name each person he has eliminated. Even though the answer would not use a name it would use the functional equivalent of a name.



Actually, wouldn't a valid answer be a list of the characteristics as requested for each monk, but omitting any duplicates, and adding any new characteristic that appears in the order? That really gives only the first (possibly second) monk's characteristics, and leaving a guessing game to the questioner what combination of traits each successive monk has on your sheet. But it would satisfy the question, though the questioner would probably be upset their 'killer' question didn't auto-win the game. Smile

"Templar, Father, fat, clean-shaven, hood, unhooded, Brother, Franciscan, bearded, Novice, thin, Benedictine."

A clever answer for the question?

Of course, if the question asks for 'individual characteristics, including the word 'stop' after each monk', that is more obviously an abuse this trick wouldn't help with.

Perhaps I need to house-rule that questions can not refer to the character sheet's implicit ordering...or prepare some scrambled sheets.
      
Sgt Storm
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December 2006
Re:How to ask questions Tue, 25 November 2008 02:27
skerpe wrote on Sun, 17 December 2006 07:42

Hi,
I'm pretty new to this game. The first time we played, we were six to play. At first glance, six players isn't an ideal number. Four seems much better.
Anyway, one of the players came up with the following question:

Give me, in order, starting from upper left corner of your suspect sheet, in rows towards the bottom right corner: all characteristics of the monks you have marked as seen.

"What?" That was the groups reaction too. Well, since the question didn't imply naming a suspect, I allowed it.

But still.... Just wondering what others think about this one.

Cheers,
Lion of Flanders.


Of course, the player can always decline to answer.

Reading the rules literally, such a question is legal. However, this is a lame question and obviously not in the spirit of the game (on several levels). I would not allow it as it essentially asks for all information gathered by that player. You could also consider it multiple questions at once, as it asks about each suspect on your sheet.
      
Lord_Nibbler
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Second Lieutenant

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December 2006
Re:How to ask questions Thu, 24 September 2009 11:51
It can be very enoying to make everything public but to go all the time aside lets the other players get bored.

We tend to allow the question to be written in paper and the answer to be given out aloud; makes the game more fun

Afterall, why should other monks hear your conversations from the other side of the abbey?

About the question of ticked monks I think is a very unfair question to ask and I would not allow it.
      
Mighty Jim 83
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Starshiy Leytenant

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August 2009
Re:How to ask questions Tue, 26 January 2010 17:25
First time we played this, we tried making all questions and answer secret (i.e. just the two players involved knowing what was said).

It just made things very awkward, and made the game last for absolutely hours!

Much more fun asking simple, open questions, you can still gain an advantage on other people by virtue of what's in your hand.
      
Sgt Storm
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Re:How to ask questions Thu, 28 January 2010 23:18
If you don't want everyone to hear you question and answer, then you may opt to not ask a question (OOPS, THAT IS NOT CORRECT. you must ask a question - never mind). Also, the person you ask can opt not to respond. So, I don't see a problem with the rules as written.

[Updated on: Thu, 27 January 2011 18:47]

      
BullpenPro
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January 2011
Re:How to ask questions Sun, 23 January 2011 21:52
If you land in a room with another player, the rules compel you to ask a question - it is not optional. (Rules: "If your pawn ends its move in a room already occupied by another player's pawn, you must ask that player a question." Emphasis theirs.

If the questioned player does respond, then the return question MUST be answered honestly, which makes allowing the sort of question posed here a bad idea.
      
Sgt Storm
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Re:How to ask questions Thu, 27 January 2011 18:46
Yeah, that's right. Sorry. You must ask a question.

I've played this several times recently and we (the players) talked about making the questions/answers secret, but we always decide against it. Besides the fact it may be a pain in the rear to do this efficiently, and the game will be lengthened from more limited information, secrecy really detracts from the game. The winner should be partially determined by the quality of the questions asked.

If you are clever with your questions, you can keep information from your opponents. Those that ask more direct questions, such as "Do you have so and so checked off?" will give you free information.

I usually play this game like Clue. You have some constants, which are the cards you hold in your hand and cards you have never passed. You ask a question that includes a suspect in your hand (or one you have never passed) and at least one other suspect you need information on. However, this can backfire if everyone discovers the identify of a card you have been holding back.

Regarding whether it makes sense that monks can hear conversations from several rooms away, I like to think the monks are eavesdropping on conversations or maybe gossiping about them afterwards.

[Updated on: Thu, 27 January 2011 18:52]

      
Kuildeous
Junior Member

Posts: 5
Registered:
February 2012
Re:How to ask questions Sun, 05 February 2012 00:13
Asking questions is part of the skill in this game. You have to weigh making a question useful against making a question obscure. You don't want to clue in the other players after all.

And such a rule leads to hilarity. I played a game where one player was convinced of the murderer's identity. He made his proclamation, and I revealed the card in my hand (because I'm a jerk and try to keep at least one suspect in my hand for as long as I can). The player was flummoxed. He had ruled out the suspect in my hand.

Well, he had that problem because he based his conclusion on a public answer. Sure, the monks have to answer honestly, but it's always a crap shoot when you ask, "How many skinny monks have you eliminated?" If that player is wrong (and it turns out he was), then you may draw the wrong conclusion.

This game got better when my wife made a wrong accusation as well. She based her conclusion on the player who made the wrong accusation in the first place.

[Updated on: Sun, 05 February 2012 00:16]

      
    
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